Category: Evidence-Based Strategies

Chronicle of Higher Education

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Crafting Email ‘Nudges’ to Boost Student Success

January 16, 2019 | Emily Wasserman

Evidence-Based Strategies / Improving Teaching and Learning /

Classroom-based “nudges,” or interventions that encourage but do not mandate certain behavior, can often help boost students’ performance in a course, according to feedback from teachers and recent studies. For example, Zoë Cohen, an assistant professor at the University of Arizona, saw that a large number of students failed the first exam in her “Physiology of […]

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Faculty Focus logo

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How Assessment for Learning Can Improve Students’ Content Mastery

December 17, 2018 | Emily Wasserman

Evidence-Based Strategies / Improving Teaching and Learning /

Assessment for Learning (AfL), or “formative assessment,” is a common theme in the U.S. educational landscape but it’s often overlooked in higher education. In a recent Faculty Focus article, Dr. Cathy Box, director for Teaching and Learning at Lubbock Christian University, explains AfL and how it can be used in the classroom to improve student learning […]

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Wash U logo

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Designing Better Multiple-Choice Questions

October 1, 2018 | Meg Gregory

Evidence-Based Strategies /

In a recent article for WashU’s The Source, Associate Professor in the Departments of Education and of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Andrew Butler describes his research on best practices for multiple-choice testing. He notes that the best multiple-choice tests provide at least three plausible answers and test for “real world” cognitive processing, like comparison and […]

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Teaching Critical Thinking

July 19, 2017 | Beth Fisher

Evidence-Based Strategies /

Amander Hiner explores the topic of teaching critical thinking in a segment of the Academic Minute. Hiner is Assistant Professor of English at Winthrop University and an alumna of Washington University (PhD and MA, English and American Literature). Hiner discusses research suggesting that, rather than assume that our students are learning critical-thinking skills by engaging with disciplinary […]

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Active Learning and Inclusive Teaching in Gen Chem

July 14, 2017 | Beth Fisher

Evidence-Based Strategies /

Megan Daschbach, PhD,  Senior Lecturer in Chemistry, discusses her commitment to improving student learning and helping diverse students persist in STEM in this issue of The Ampersand (Arts & Sciences). Daschbach describes her current work, with her co-instructors, integrating active learning and inclusive-teaching approaches in General Chemistry at Washington University. To learn more about inclusive teaching, and […]

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Applying Cognitive Science in the Classroom

March 13, 2017 | Gillian Parrish

Evidence-Based Strategies /

Applying insights from cognitive-science research is one of the core things we do at The Teaching Center, including through workshops for faculty, post-docs, and graduate students. Faculty Focus recently explored this topic in a trio of posts by Maryellen Weimer, PhD. (Links to each article below are arranged in order of publication date.) Weimer provides insight into […]

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Julie Stanton talk on metacognition

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Julie Stanton Talk on Metacognition

December 7, 2016 | Gillian Parrish

Evidence-Based Strategies /

The Innovations in Undergraduate Education Speaker Series continued with a recent talk on November 14, “Metacognition: How Undergraduates Self-Regulate to Learn Biology”—by Julie Stanton, PhD, (Assistant Professor of Cellular Biology, University of Georgia). Stanton began by defining metacognition as “awareness and control of thinking for the purpose of learning,” noting research suggesting that active-learning pedagogies […]

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Evidence Assertion Slide Example from Michael Alley's Craft of Scientific Presentations website

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In PowerPoint, It’s the Headline that Makes the Difference

June 16, 2016 | Shawn Nordell

Evidence-Based Strategies / Research on Teaching and Learning

PowerPoint and teaching – love it or hate it – is a prevalent combination in our classrooms. We all have seen the default slide format: a short, topical title with a bullet list of text and/or a figure underneath. But is this the best format for your students learning? That is the question that the […]

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Meta Teaching Center logo

Lessons on Flipping the Classroom

May 9, 2016 | Bryn Lutes

Evidence-Based Strategies

The Chronicle of Higher Education has published a collection of articles, “Guide to the Flipped Classroom” that offers some lessons learned by faculty. The “flipped” classroom has existed for decades. The simplest explanation of a flipped classroom is that the students do classwork at home and homework in class. For instance, students may watch a lecture […]

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STEM FIT logo

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STEM Faculty Institute on Teaching: Applications Still Being Accepted

April 8, 2016 | Teaching Center Staff

Announcements / Evidence-Based Strategies

The 2016 STEM Faculty Institute on Teaching will take place June 14-16 on the Danforth Campus. The institute is open to full-time faculty in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). The application deadline is Friday, March 28, 2016. Applicants will be informed of the status of their application by Friday, April 1, 2016. We hope to achieve […]

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